Voice of the Mirror: Government’s green economy plan are more style than substance

Boris Johnson unveiled the plan this week (Image: POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

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PM’s false eco-nomy

IF we are to tackle the climate crisis and create jobs then the country needs to invest in the green economy.

To this end the Government has announced a 10-point plan to cut carbon emissions, support new technologies and boost employment.

While it is welcome, the scale of what the PM is proposing is disappointingly limited.

Only £3billion of the promised £12billion in investment is new money, while many of the measures are reheated announcements – the one form of recycling we don’t need.

He is promising to create or safeguard 250,000 posts.

(Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

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Yet the TUC research shows that fast-tracked spending on green infrastructure could create 1.24 million good jobs by 2022.

By contrast with the UK, France is spending more than £30billion and Germany more than £45billion on boosting their green economies.

When the country faces employment and climate emergencies what the Government is offering falls far short of what is necessary.

Mr Johnson has squandered a golden opportunity to turn the country green with measures that are more style over substance.

Yule pay for it

After such a gruelling year everyone would like to be able to spend Christmas with their families.

Government scientists say that may be possible, but it could come at a price.

They warn that for every day we ease the lockdown measures we will need another five of tougher restrictions at a later date.

We now face the difficult dilemma of how to allow families to be together without causing further spread of the virus. Some will argue the risk of easing the restrictions is too high, others that it is a sacrifice worth making.

A vaccine cannot come soon enough.

Pie & mighty

Budget mince pies from Iceland and Asda have beaten pricier competitors in a blind taste test.

When it came to judging the proof was in the pudding.

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