New Damning Report Sheds More Light on Bryan Singer Allegations

The Atlantic has published a new expansive report that gives a voice to the the alleged victims of director Bryan Singer’s sexual misconduct, many of whom were minors at the time. Authors Alex French and Maximillian Potter did extensive research, speaking to over 50 sources over a 12-month investigation. The report was originally thought to appear in Esquire magazine, which the writers are affiliated with. Back on October 15th, Singer posted to his Instagram that the magazine was going to write a negative article about him. But the truth will out!

Among the revelations in the article is a description of misconduct on the set of Apt Pupil during a shower scene:

“That scene would lead to a series of lawsuits against Singer and the production. At least five plaintiffs, all minors between the ages of 14 and 17, were extras in the film and, in essence, claimed that members of the crew had bullied them into stripping naked for the shower scene. The boys and some of their parents said they’d been aware that the job called for partial nudity, which they had been led to believe meant wearing a Speedo or a towel. One of the crew members later said he thought that there had been a screwup the day of the shoot—that only the adult extras were supposed to have been asked to appear naked, and that somehow the minor and adult extras had been mixed together. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office declined to press any criminal charges; the suits—which alleged negligence, unlawful sexual harassment, invasion of privacy, and intentional infliction of emotional distress—were settled for an undisclosed sum, and all parties were bound by confidentiality agreements.”

Image via Warner Bros.

One actor on the set added his harrowing story, “After being dropped off by his father one morning, he was directed to the locker room. Shooting was about to begin. He remembers that the locker room had been divided—a screen here and lights over there. A crew member gave him a towel and told him to disrobe completely and wrap the towel around his waist. He was 13 years old.  […] Singer came back and made small talk. How are you doing? Do you need anything? ‘Every time he had a chance—three times—he would go back there … He was always touching my chest.’”

And yet, as the article explains:

“Singer continues to enjoy the benefit of the doubt in Hollywood. This fall, Millennium Films signed Singer to direct Red Sonja, an adaptation of a sword-and-sorcery comic book, for a reported $10 million. (Asked why Singer was hired despite the allegations against him, a Millennium publicist said, “I am afraid the response is ‘unavailable for comment.’ ”) The protagonist of Red Sonja is a survivor of sexual assault.”

I mean truly, what are they thinking? It’s worth noting, as well, that Singer is the director of the Bohemian Rhapsody, though was fired two weeks before the end of production. The savvy campaigns for the film, which was nominated for five Academy Awards, has kept Singer’s name out of everything regarding its marketing, even though he remains the credited director. As the report also adds,

“According to three sources who know what happened on and off the set, both Stacey Snider, the chairman and CEO of 20th Century Fox, and Emma Watts, Fox’s vice chair and president of production, had had concerns when the project came their way with Singer already attached. But Singer had the support of the surviving members of Queen. The choice for Fox was to do the film with him or to not do it at all. According to the three sources, it wasn’t an easy decision.”

The article ends with a haunting statement. Cesar Sanchez-Guzman, who sued Singer in December 2017 over a rape allegation from 2003 (the case is still pending), told the reporters: “The industry will brush things under the rug and pretend nothing happened. Most people don’t see the truth.”